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Bistatic & Multistatic Radar

Bistatic radar has a long history, dating back to the earliest days of radar. It is presently the subject of expanded interest, with new systems being designed and evaluated. This tutorial provides an overview of the fundamentals of bistatic radar, and then covers current advances in systems and results.
Author Information: 

Hugh Griffiths was educated at Hardye’s School, Dorchester, and Oxford University, and received the PhD and DSc(Eng) degrees from the University of London.

In 2009 he was appointed to the THALES/Royal Academy of Engineering Chair at University College London. Prior to that he was Principal of the Defence College of Management and Technology, Shrivenham. From 1982–2006 he was with University College London, serving as Head of the Department from 2001–2006. His research interests include radar and sonar sensor systems and signal processing (particularly bistatic and multistatic radar). He has published over 400 papers and technical articles, including the book 'Advances in Bistatic Radar' in 2007.

He received a number of prizes, including the IEEE Nathanson Award in 1996. He serves on the IEEE AESS Board of Governors, as Chairman of the IEEE AESS Radar Systems Panel and he was Chairman of the International Radar Conference RADAR 2002. He also serves on the Defence Scientific Advisory Council for the UK Ministry of Defence. In 1997 he was elected to Fellowship of the Royal Academy of Engineering.

Abstract: 

Bistatic radar has a long history, dating back to the earliest days of radar. It is presently the subject of expanded interest, and new systems are now being designed and evaluated, for applications including SAR and GMTI surveillance from UAVs, air defense and counter-stealth. Ofparticular current interest is Passive Bistatic Radar, using broadcast, communications or radionavigation signals as the illumination sources.

The tutorial, presented by one of the editors of the recently-published book ‘Advances in Bistatic Radar’, provides an introduction to the the fundamentals of bistatic radar, showing how the properties depend on the bistatic geometry. This is followed by a more detailed description of the subject of Passive Bistatic Radar and of Bistatic SAR. Examples of a number of practical systems and their results are given and discussed.